Donor conception.

If you are struggling to start or grow your family, you may be considering egg, sperm or embryo donation. This is a major decision and there are several considerations you must take into account. At Aria Fertility, we can support and guide you through the decision-making process.

Donor conception.

If you are struggling to start or grow your family, you may be considering egg, sperm or embryo donation. This is a major decision and there are several considerations you must take into account. At Aria Fertility, we can support and guide you through the decision-making process.

The journey to becoming a parent can be hugely challenging and there are many reasons why an egg, sperm or embryo donor is required.

Am I suitable for donor conception?

There are many reasons why you may be considering donor eggs, sperm or embryos as a way to build your family.

  • You aren’t producing eggs due to age-related infertility, ovarian failure or past medical treatment
  • You are experiencing premature menopause
  • Male factor infertility contributes to up to half of all cases of infertility and some men are unable to produce viable sperm
  • You have been advised that using your own eggs or sperm is unlikely to result in a successful pregnancy
  • You are at risk of passing on a genetic condition
  • You are a same-sex couple
  • You are single and wish to start your family

Which fertility treatments can I use donor eggs, sperm or embryos for?

We can use donor eggs, sperm or embryos instead of your own as part of In Vitro Fertilisation, Intrauterine insemination (IUI) or Surrogacy.

How do I find a donor?

An unknown donor is someone not known to an individual or couple who is willing to donate their eggs, sperm or embryos altruistically. At Aria we can provide you with help and support to find a suitable match with an unknown donor through our approved donation agencies and clinics. We will ensure that all the necessary checks and screening have been performed in accordance with the national regulations and guidelines. We can help advise you of the legal ramifications and implications of donor conception and provide you with the necessary counselling.

A known donor is typically a friend or family member that has offered to provide their eggs or sperm. Before they can donate it is essential for them to go through the same tests and screening as an unknown donor before they will be accepted to donate eggs, sperm or embryos in your own fertility treatment.

Frequently asked questions.

According to the HFEA Act 1990 the woman who carries and gives birth to a child is the legal parent of that child. Therefore donors (of eggs, sperm and embryos) have no legal responsibility to the children born as a result of their donation.

This covers the following:

  • they will not be named on the birth certificate
  • they have no financial obligations
  • they will have no rights over how the child is brought up

If you are using an unknown donor through a provider that is licensed in the UK, you will not be informed of any details that may potentially reveal who they are.

Information that can be given includes a general physical description of their characteristics including height, weight, eye and hair colour. You can also be informed of their year of birth, their ethnicity, their medical history and whether they had any children at the time of donation.

This depends on whether the eggs, sperm or embryos are available. If you would like to use the same donor in the future, then it is important to discuss this with us at the beginning of your journey.

In the UK, the current regulations only allow an egg or sperm donor to create up to ten families not including their own. A donor may place restrictions on the use of the eggs or sperm; for example, if a friend or family member is donating they may restrict that only you may benefit from the donation.

Any children conceived as a result of your treatment will have a right to request the following information from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFEA) register once they are 16 years of age:

  • whether they were conceived by donation
  • whether they are related to any person with whom they may have an intimate relationship
  • the donor’s non-identifying information

At 18, they are able to ask for their donor’s name, date of birth and last known address. They can also join the Donor Sibling Link run by the HFEA and find out the contact details for any genetic siblings if they have also joined.

Your next step.

When you are ready and the time is right for you, the next step is to contact us and we will help you arrange a face-to-face, telephone or video-call introduction with one of our consultants.

You can do this by filling in the contact form below or by giving one of our friendly team a call on +44 (0) 203 263 6025 or emailing us at admin@ariafertility.co.uk.